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Tuesday, 07 February 2023
Pulse, the Pan-African Media Company Expands to Côte d’Ivoire

Pulse, the Pan-African Media Company Expands to Côte d’Ivoire

2022-10-31

 

Pulse, the Pan-African Media Company, has been operating in the African nation of Côte d’Ivoire for the past several years, and its operations have only strengthened. With the current political climate in the West and the ongoing violence in the North, many people have expressed a wish to put aside their differences and coexist. With the outbreak of the civil war in the North, many journalists have been arrested or killed, and many media outlets have closed their doors because they don’t have the resources or the equipment needed to continue operating. The country’s media landscape has long been dominated by one media company, and its journalists only recently gained the right to work for other media outlets. But now, with the new owner of the company, the situation has changed, and Pulse has become the first pan-African media company to expand into the North.

The Impact of the North African Civil War

The North African Civil War, also called the Algerian War or the Arab- Algerian War, was a long and highly destructive conflict between an estimated 250,000 Europeans, indigenous Algerians, and an estimated 200,000 Arabs in what is now Algeria, Morocco, and Tunisia. The war began after French colonists declared war on Morocco in 1830 and it was eventually concluded in 1942, with the Vichy regime in France officially approving defeat in 1943. The war was the largest between European and Middle Eastern empires, and is the only one in which most of the countries involved were European colonies.

The war was fought between variously motivated independent nations, including France, Italy, the Netherlands, the Kingdom of Morocco, and the United Kingdom. The Allied powers consisted of France, the United Kingdom, and the United States, as well as their respective allies Germany and Italy.

The Importance of Pan-African Journalism

For most of the 20th century, European colonialism and imperial expansion was closely integrated with the expansion of the African slave trade. The “lost cause” of colonialism, according to some scholars, has been rediscovered by a new generation of Europeans. The African diaspora, which had been largely neglected by the European colonial powers, is now receiving widespread attention. With the fall of the Berlin Wall and the dissolution of the Soviet Union, many ex-Soviet countries have become independent. Colonialism is also being challenged from within, as many former colonies have begun to re-assert their independence. The newly formed Commonwealth of Nations has the objective of solidifying the African diaspora’s place in global political and cultural affairs.

Badawi and Pulse

In January 2016, the Kuwait-based investment company Vision Fund II plans to acquire a controlling stake in Pan-African media company Pulse. The deal value is estimated at $1.1 billion. The purchase is intended to “repatriate” the company to West Africa, where it will continue to operate as a completely independent subsidiary of the Kuwait-based investment company. The deal is expected to be completed in the second half of 2016.

 
 

The Future of Pan-African Media

The company is planning to expand its operations in Côte d’Ivoire, where it now has a presence, by opening an additional office in Abidjan. The company also plans to open an office in Tunisia, where its majority owner, Vision Fund II, has investment interests. The company also plans to increase its staff from 25 to 50 over the next two years, and plans to expand its coverage to include the North and the West, as well as the more conservative eastern section of the country.

Ivory Coast and Pulse

In January 2016, the West African country of Ivory Coast declared independence from France. The move followed the country’s defeat in a failed military rebellion against the government in November 2015. In the decades following World War II, many African countries gained independence, only to find themselves immediately targeted by the newly formed African National Congress (ANC) government in South Africa. The civil war in the North of the country briefly interrupted the flow of goods and information between the two parts of the country, and even threatened to destroy the country’s only bridge across the river Kwai. The West African country of Côte d’Ivoire shares a border with Ivory Coast and is the most obvious place to turn for news from the two countries.

Summing Up

The future of pan-African journalism is promising. The Kuwait investment company Vision Fund II plans to acquire a controlling stake in Pan-African media company Pulse. The deal value is estimated at $1.1 billion. The purchase is intended to “repatriate” the company to West Africa, where it will continue to operate as a completely independent subsidiary of the Kuwait-based investment company.

Pulse, which has been operating in the African nation of Côte d’Ivoire for the past several years, has only strengthened. With the current political climate in the West and the ongoing violence in the North, many people have expressed a wish to put aside their differences and coexist. With the outbreak of the civil war in the North, many journalists have been arrested or killed, and many media outlets have closed their doors because they don’t have the resources or the equipment needed to continue operating. The country’s media landscape has long been dominated by one media company, and its journalists only recently gained the right to work for other media outlets. But now, with the new owner of the company, the situation has changed, and Pulse has become the first pan-African media company to expand into the North.

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